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Wild Horse Sanctuary

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Rebecca Hendricks
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Wild Horse Sanctuary

Postby Rebecca Hendricks on Sun Aug 15, 2010 7:01 pm

The Wild Horse Sanctuary in Shingletown, California is set below Mount Lassen on the western slope of the Sierra's. The 5,000 acre sanctuary provides a natural setting for roughly 300 wild horses and 15 burros. These animals are fortunate. They will live natural lives among the oaks, pines and lava strewn creeks and hillsides. The sanctuary is a natural setting, offering as many of the elements they would be afforded in the wild as possible. At the sanctuary the horses are free to form their own bands. There are families with the stallions always alert and ready to maintain his band. Young bachelors tend to bunch together, sometimes grazing quietly side by side. At other times you will catch them flexing their muscles amongst themselves. The mares are either tending their foals or babysitting for others. Being a natural sanctuary the horses and burros are not the only residents. The sanctuary is shared with many species of birds, reptiles, squirrels, gophers, jack rabbits, deer, bears, coyotes and cougars.

None of this wild equine wonderland would be possible if not for the efforts of Dianne Nelson. In 1978, 80 horses had been deemed unadoptable by the BLM and were destined to be slaughtered. Most of the original rescues were beautiful young mares, just 2-3 years old. The local area had already absorbed gathered horses for two years. There was just no place for them. Without hesitation the decision was made to save them. Dianne and her family sprang in to action.
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Re: Wild Horse Sanctuary

Postby Rebecca Hendricks on Sun Aug 15, 2010 11:38 pm

Although the Wild Horse Sanctuary currently sets on 5000 acres, the land alone is not able to provide feed for the horses and burros. The sanctuary must supplement with feed. Depending on the weather and the natural grass crop, it may be necessary to provide feed nine to ten months out of the year. A typical month would require roughly 40 tons of hay.
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Re: Wild Horse Sanctuary

Postby Rebecca Hendricks on Mon Aug 16, 2010 12:27 am

The Wild Horse Sanctuary continues to assist in improving the conditions for the American legends in the wild. The sanctuary works closely with the University of California at Davis in the development of reversible birth control studies. They are working with PZP, a contraceptive that is expected to prevent pregnancy for 3-5 years with a single dose. No lines of lineage will be permanently lost with this method. The natural social behavior of the horses is also preserved.

The sanctuary is committed to campaign and act in the interest of the horses in the wild. Hot issues, press releases and contact information is available on their website www.wildhorsesanctuary.org
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Re: Wild Horse Sanctuary

Postby Rebecca Hendricks on Mon Aug 16, 2010 1:28 am

The sanctuary serves as a model for the proper management of herds in the wild. They are active in increasing public awareness about the important environmental, biological and social value of these living American legends.
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Re: Wild Horse Sanctuary

Postby Rebecca Hendricks on Mon Aug 16, 2010 1:46 am

The community also benefits from the efforts of the sanctuary through various youth programs they offer. There are programs to assist disadvantaged children, and school groups. Troubled teens have the opportunity to learn about these fabulous animals and learn to care for them. Internships are offered to college students for a wide variety of equine studies.
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Re: Wild Horse Sanctuary

Postby Rebecca Hendricks on Mon Aug 16, 2010 2:00 am

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Re: Wild Horse Sanctuary

Postby Rebecca Hendricks on Mon Aug 16, 2010 2:10 am

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Re: Wild Horse Sanctuary

Postby Rebecca Hendricks on Mon Aug 16, 2010 2:35 am

Wild Horse Sanctuary has been able to purchase some of the 5,000 acres they currently lease. In addition to the funds required to maintain the nutrition of the horses, they are working on their capital campaign to permanently secure more of the land.

The Sanctuary is open to visitors. The hours can be found posted on their website, shown below.

The Wild Horse Sanctuary offers a unique fund raiser. In the spring and summer visitors can schedule 2-3 day pack trips. The visitors are well mounted and travel through horse country rich in history and lore. The base camp borders a lake.

Wild Horse Sanctuary hosts it's Anniversary Celebration in August. The horses are gently brought in closer for better viewing by the public. It is a festive, fun and educational event. Funds are raised through silent auction and raffles. It is a wonderful way to experience the sanctuary.

Further funds are raised through horse sponsorships. A horse can be sponsored for just one month, or a year at a time.

The maintenance on a facility such as this in on-going. There is always a need for a wide array of skills, marketing, fund raising, carpenters, fence repair, horse trainers. There is more information about the volunteer work days and donations on the Wild Horse Sanctuary's website www.wildhorsesanctuary.org
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